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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a common condition that affects an estimated 13 million Americans1 that causes pain, numbness, and tingling in the hand and arm. The condition occurs when one of the major nerves in the hand—the median nerve—is compressed as it travels through the wrist. The median nerve controls movement in the thumb and feeling in the thumb and first three fingers. It runs down the arm and forearm, passes through the carpal tunnel at the wrist, and goes into the hand.

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Traditional Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery

More severe cases of CTS may be treated surgically through carpal tunnel release (CTR), which involves cutting the transverse carpal ligament to relieve pressure on the median nerve. Traditional CTR techniques can remedy the condition, but may result in large and sometimes painful scars, ongoing palmar pain, and a long road to recovery.2,3,4 

A New Way to Treat Carpal Tunnel Syndrome for Faster Recovery

Now there is an alternative surgical option—Carpal Tunnel Release with UltraGuideCTR™ and real-time ultrasound guidance.

CTR using ultrasound guidance relieves the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome while minimizing recovery time. Most patients can return to work and the activities they love in 3-6 days.2,6,7

Performing CTR with ultrasound guidance allows most patients to enjoy immediate motion so they can focus on getting back to their lives and the activities they love. 2,6,7

If you have carpal tunnel syndrome and are considering a surgical procedure, carpal tunnel release with UltraGuideCTR and real-time ultrasound guidance may be right for you.

Significant benefits2,6,7:

  • Most patients can return to work and the activities they love within 3-6 days
  • Performed in a procedure room or office setting
  • Typically performed using local anesthesia
  • Small incision typically closed without sutures
  • Aspirin or Ibuprofen typically used for pain management
  • Postoperative therapy typically not required
  • Immediate motion of the hand for rapid recovery

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REFERENCES

Papanicolaou GD, et al. The prevalence and characteristics of nerve compression syndromes in the general population. J Hand Surg 2001;26A:460-6.
Rojo-Manaute JM, Capa-Grasa A, Chana-Rodriguez F, et al. Ultra-minimally invasive sonographically guided carpal tunnel release: a randomized clinical trial. J Ultrasound Med. 2016 Jun;35(6):1149-1157.
Sayegh ET, et. al. Open versus endoscopic carpal tunnel release: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Clin Orthop Rel Res 2015;473:1120-1132.
Zhang S, et. al. Cost-minimization analysis of open and endoscopic carpal tunnel release. J Bone Joint Surg Am 2016;98:1970-7.
Nakamichi K, Tachibana S, Yamamoto S, et al. Percutaneous carpal tunnel release compared with mini-open release using ultrasonographic guidance for both techniques. J Hand Surg Am. 2010 Mar;35(3):437-445.
Henning PT, Yang L, Awan T, et al. Minimally invasive ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release: preliminary clinical results. J Ultrasound Med. 2018 Nov;37(11):2699-2706.
Sonex Health CTR patient registry. Data on file.
 

 

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